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'Microhospitals' Fill Some Emergency Room Needs
'Microhospitals' Fill Some Emergency Room Needs
With an eye on fast-growing urban and suburban markets, some health care systems are opening tiny, full-service hospitals with comprehensive emergency services but often with fewer than a dozen inpatient beds, according to a report from Kaiser Health N...
New Surgical Tool for Mitral Valve Repair Demonstrates Success in First Human Clinical Study
New Surgical Tool for Mitral Valve Repair Demonstrates Success in First Human Clinical Study
Researchers investigating a novel device to repair the mitral heart valve report 100 percent procedural success in a safety and performance study, the first such study done in humans. The image-guided device, based on technology developed at the Univer...
Opioid Paradox: Could Morphine Use Hurt As Much As It Helps By Prolonging Chronic Pain?
Opioid Paradox: Could Morphine Use Hurt As Much As It Helps By Prolonging Chronic Pain?
It's important to start off by noting that the opioid study everyone's buzzing about was conducted on animals and not humans. The research by Colorado University's Peter Grace and Linda Watkins looked at injured rats that were given morphine and came t...
Acetaminophen: Is It As Safe As We Think?
Acetaminophen: Is It As Safe As We Think?
Whether in your handbag, a drawer at home, or your desk at work, chances are you have acetaminophen on hand, just in case headache or back pain strikes. It is the most widely used pain relief medication in the United States, and it is also considered o...
Zika: CDC Monitors 270 Women Who Have Tested Positive For Virus
Zika: CDC Monitors 270 Women Who Have Tested Positive For Virus
More than 270 pregnant women in the United States and its territories have tested positive for the Zika virus, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among the 157 women in the U.S. with the virus, only 49 percent re...
Study: More Than Half of Hospitals Holding Off On Value-Based Care
Study: More Than Half of Hospitals Holding Off On Value-Based Care
The majority of U.S. hospitals are still trying to determine how exactly the new landscape of alternative payment models will form and, as such, indicated that they are holding off for now, according to a study published by Peer60. Indeed, 37 percent o...
CDC: One-Fifth of Americans Visit ER Once a Year
CDC: One-Fifth of Americans Visit ER Once a Year
While emergency rooms are known for being busy, new national research shows the level of patients in the five most populous states does not vary widely - though they make up more than one-third of all emergency room visits in the United States.
How Hospitals Prepare for the Worst
How Hospitals Prepare for the Worst
Last month, the tragic mass shooting in an Orlando nightclub rattled our nation. In all, 49 people lost their lives, with many others injured. But fortunately, the trauma teams, first responders and the staff of the Orlando Regional Medical Center were...
Kidney Stones Rise Significantly Among US Women, Increasing Kidney Failure Risk, New Studies Show
Kidney Stones Rise Significantly Among US Women, Increasing Kidney Failure Risk, New Studies Show
Kidney stones rise significantly among U.S. women, increasing the risk of kidney failure, according to a new study. Study lead Gregory E. Tasian said, “The emergence of kidney stones in children is particularly worrisome, because there is limited...
What parts of the Affordable Care Act are nationally embedded?
What parts of the Affordable Care Act are nationally embedded?
Since its enactment, the Affordable Care Act has been rife with opposition on both sides of the aisle, and it has undeniably created sweeping changes to the landscape of American healthcare. If the latest data can be believed, the law seems to have mad...
Doctor: Orlando Emergency Room Was 'Surreal'
Doctor: Orlando Emergency Room Was 'Surreal'
Trauma doctors at the local hospital that is treating many of the wounded from the Orlando nightclub massacre described for reporters on June 14 the large numbers of patients that came into their emergency bay for treatment of gun shot wounds after the...
80 Percent of ER Providers Hesitant To Ask Patients About Gender, Sexual Orientation
80 Percent of ER Providers Hesitant To Ask Patients About Gender, Sexual Orientation
For emergency medicine clinicians who learned to defer to patients' privacy on sexual orientation and gender identification, asking questions is a major culture change.
Doctors Wrestle With Mixed Messages When Deciding Whether To Prescribe Painkillers
Doctors Wrestle With Mixed Messages When Deciding Whether To Prescribe Painkillers
Steve Diaz, an emergency medicine doctor at Augusta’s Maine General Health, says he knows what patients want when they come to him in pain. Drugs. And preferably strong ones.
3 in 4 Physicians Say Their Organization Is Not Addressing Burnout
3 in 4 Physicians Say Their Organization Is Not Addressing Burnout
A majority of physicians do not feel their employer or practice is doing enough to address and prevent burnout, according to a "microsurvey" of 200 primary care and emergency medicine physicians from InCrowd, a real-time market intelligence provider.
Counseling in ER Can Reduce Youth Violence
Counseling in ER Can Reduce Youth Violence
New research suggests 30 minutes of counseling during an emergency room visit can decrease a young person's involvement in future violent behaviors.
Fentanyl: The Scariest Opioid?
Fentanyl: The Scariest Opioid?
Recently, Prince died from a fentanyl overdose. The tragedy has drawn attention to a powerful drug that until recently flew under the radar. Fentanyl, a prescription pain medication, is part of the opioid class that includes prescription drugs such as ...
New Delirium Test May Be Simpler, More Accurate
New Delirium Test May Be Simpler, More Accurate
A simple test for delirium that is accurate and quick, is easily administered, and does not require patient participation may provide a more accurate diagnostic tool, new research suggests.
Concussions Caused By Playground Accidents Are On the Rise
Concussions Caused By Playground Accidents Are On the Rise
Monkey bars aren’t all fun and games. Concussions caused by playground accidents are on the rise, according to a new study out Monday. And swings and monkey bars are the biggest dangers. There’s been a 57 percent increase in ER visits relat...
Trampoline Parks Tied to Jump in Emergency Room Visits
Trampoline Parks Tied to Jump in Emergency Room Visits
As trampoline parks are becoming more common in the U.S., so are emergency department visits for injuries that happen at these recreational facilities, a new study suggests.
Isopropyl Alcohol Nasal Inhalation Effective Treatment for ED Nausea
Isopropyl Alcohol Nasal Inhalation Effective Treatment for ED Nausea
Investigators randomized a convenience sample of 80 patients in the ED presenting with nausea or vomiting to either inhaled isopropyl alcohol (37) or saline solution (43). Subjects would nasally inhale at 0, 2, and 4 minutes. Nausea outcomes were self-...
Infant Rotavirus Vaccination Program Reduces Hospitalizations By 70 Percent
Infant Rotavirus Vaccination Program Reduces Hospitalizations By 70 Percent
Implementation of a rotavirus vaccination program in Ontario resulted in significant decreases in hospitalizations and ED utilization, according to results published in PLoS One. In 2011, Ontario launched a provincewide rotavirus immunization program ...
Doctors Test Tools to Predict Your Odds of a Disease
Doctors Test Tools to Predict Your Odds of a Disease
Thomas McGinn, chairman of medicine at a major New York hospital system, is betting he can predict if a patient has strep, pneumonia or other ailments not by ordering traditional lab tests or imaging scans, but by calculating probabilities with a softw...
Gun Injuries: Are They Getting More Deadly?
Gun Injuries: Are They Getting More Deadly?
New research suggests that between the years 2000 and 2013, the injuries sustained by victims of firearms violence grew both more severe and more deadly, even as mortality from other traumatic injuries declined.
Blood Pressure Spikes Don't Always Need Emergency Room Care
Blood Pressure Spikes Don't Always Need Emergency Room Care
A sudden spike in blood pressure is not an indication to bring the patient to the emergency room, a new study has revealed.
Sorry, We Don't Take Obamacare
Sorry, We Don't Take Obamacare
Amy Moses and her circle of self-employed small-business owners were supporters of President Barack Obama and the Affordable Care Act. They bought policies on the newly created New York State exchange. But when they called doctors and hospitals in Manh...
Study: Many With Migraines Have Vitamin Deficiencies
Study: Many With Migraines Have Vitamin Deficiencies
A high percentage of children, teens and young adults with migraines appear to have mild deficiencies in vitamin D, riboflavin and coenzyme Q10 — a vitamin-like substance found in every cell of the body that is used to produce energy for cell gro...
Naloxone Eases Pain of Heroin Epidemic, But Not Without Consequences
Naloxone Eases Pain of Heroin Epidemic, But Not Without Consequences
A woman in her 30s was sitting in a car in a parking lot here last month, shooting up heroin, when she overdosed. Even after the men she was with injected her with naloxone, the drug that reverses opioid overdoses, she remained unconscious. They called...
Hand Hygiene: Electronic Monitoring Tools Just 1 Element of Compliance Plans
Hand Hygiene: Electronic Monitoring Tools Just 1 Element of Compliance Plans
Electronic monitoring tools may help promote hand-hygiene compliance, but ensuring that the habit sticks will require leaders to fully commit to enforcement, a study has found. Though proper hand hygiene is considered essential to avoid the spread of i...
How Stress Increases Seizures For Patients With Epilepsy
How Stress Increases Seizures For Patients With Epilepsy
It is well known that stress can increase the frequency and severity of seizures for patients with epilepsy. Now, researchers have shed light on why this is, and they may have even found a way to stop it. Published in the journal Science Signaling, the...
The Speed of Sound: Assessing Tendons For Trauma, Infection
The Speed of Sound: Assessing Tendons For Trauma, Infection
Bedside ultrasound can be especially useful for assessing tendons — in trauma, repetitive motion injury and suspected infection. Having a basic understanding of the normal and abnormal appearance of tendons on ultrasound will give the emergency p...
Tiny Coils Improve Quality of Life For Patients With Severe Emphysema
Tiny Coils Improve Quality of Life For Patients With Severe Emphysema
The minimally invasive implantation of tiny coils into the lungs improves exercise ability, lung function and quality of life for patients with severe emphysema, according to a large international trial presented by researchers at the University of Pit...
CDC Says 1 in 3 Antibiotic Prescriptions Is Unnecessary
CDC Says 1 in 3 Antibiotic Prescriptions Is Unnecessary
At least 1 in 3 antibiotic prescriptions written in the U.S. is considered unnecessary for the conditions they are used to treat, a new study found. The study published in JAMA, was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention using data...
Delayed Discharge Is 'Existential Threat' To Emergency Medicine
Delayed Discharge Is 'Existential Threat' To Emergency Medicine
Unnecessary delays in discharging patients pose an “existential threat” to emergency medicine, the Royal College of Emergency Medicine has warned after the chief executive of NHS England admitted that the problem may not be dealt with for f...
Increase revenue growth by capturing the managed Medicaid Care market
Increase revenue growth by capturing the managed Medicaid Care market
One of the largest opportunities for medical practice revenue growth in the next few years is the Managed Medicaid Care market. Nearly 93 million individuals will be eligible for Medicaid by 2024, and the vast majority of them are likely to enter manag...
CDC: Data Shows Zika Virus Stays Longer in Urine Than Blood
CDC: Data Shows Zika Virus Stays Longer in Urine Than Blood
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its diagnostic testing guidelines for the Zika virus on May 10, based on early data showing that it can be found at higher levels or last longer in urine than in blood. The agency now recommen...
Women With Migraine Face Increased CV Risk
Women With Migraine Face Increased CV Risk
Women who have migraine headaches have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new results from a large observational study published in The BMJ. Earlier studies have established a strong link between migraine and stroke,...
High Demand And Rising Salaries Await Young Physicians
High Demand And Rising Salaries Await Young Physicians
I’m told by his mother that my nephew, Andrew L. Kelly, MD, could have nearly any physician job he wanted, anywhere in the country, and for a terrific salary. Her mailbox has been stuffed with recruiting offers for him.
Anemia Negatively Affects Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injuries
Anemia Negatively Affects Recovery From Traumatic Brain Injuries
Approximately half of patients hospitalized with traumatic brain injuries are anemic, according to recent studies, but anemia's effects on the recovery of these patients is not clear. Now, researchers have found evidence that anemia can negatively infl...
Only 3 States Require E-Prescribing of Narcotics Despite Its Benefits
Only 3 States Require E-Prescribing of Narcotics Despite Its Benefits
Electronic prescribing of controlled substances reduces fraud and keeps patients from getting multiple prescriptions for the same drug, but only three states require it and one doesn't even enforce its law. As much of the country struggles with record ...
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in a Gymnast
Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in a Gymnast
Primary care providers often are responsible for the initial evaluation and management plan of young patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI, also called concussion), and need to be familiar with new protocols and how to incorporate them in...
Hospitals Feeling Pinch in States That Don't Expand Medicaid
Hospitals Feeling Pinch in States That Don't Expand Medicaid
While most hospitals have seen a stark decrease in uncompensated care costs related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid expansion, some hospital groups have not substantially benefited from the change.
Handheld Device Detects Heart Attacks With One Drop of Blood
Handheld Device Detects Heart Attacks With One Drop of Blood
A new handheld blood test device is able to rapidly diagnosis heart attacks at the point of care. The new Minicare I-20 handheld device, developed by Philips, is designed for use in emergency departments to dramatically reduce the time physicians take ...
Fentanyl-Laced 'Norco' Is Lethal, Report Warns
Fentanyl-Laced 'Norco' Is Lethal, Report Warns
A street drug sold illegally as the prescription painkiller Norco is much stronger and more dangerous than the real medication, researchers warn.
Dexamethasone For Asthma in the ER: Better Compliance, Nearly Equal Effectiveness
Dexamethasone For Asthma in the ER: Better Compliance, Nearly Equal Effectiveness
Adults with asthma who were treated with one-dose dexamethasone in the emergency department had only slightly higher relapse than patients who were treated with a 5-day course of prednisone. "Enhanced compliance and convenience may support the use of d...
Delirium Often Seen in Cancer Patients in Emergency Departments
Delirium Often Seen in Cancer Patients in Emergency Departments
Delirium is fairly common, yet often missed, in advanced cancer patients who visit emergency departments, according to a study published in Cancer.
If Not Lyme Disease, What Caused This Man's Fever?
If Not Lyme Disease, What Caused This Man's Fever?
Nonno says he doesn't feel good, the 8-year-old girl reported, handing her mother a digital thermometer. The woman looked at the readout - just under 102 degrees.
Return Visits To the ER More Likely For Patients With Limited English
Return Visits To the ER More Likely For Patients With Limited English
Patients in the emergency room who don't speak English well are slightly more likely to return within days, suggesting their care the first time was not as good as it could have been, researchers say. In a study in one New York hospital, about 4 percen...
One-Hour Window for High-Sensitivity Troponin MI Rule-Out Backed in Studies
One-Hour Window for High-Sensitivity Troponin MI Rule-Out Backed in Studies
High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) assays used with low cutoff values, performed within the first hour after presentation, safely and effectively ruled out MI in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain in two European...
Empowering Pediatric Pain Medicine
Empowering Pediatric Pain Medicine
Canada stands at the verge of a new standard of pediatric pain management, thanks to the dedicated leadership of Samina Ali. Over the last few years, she has been making headlines for leading several research projects revealing that Canada's children a...
Doctors Changing Their Approach To Common Heart Attack Treatment
Doctors Changing Their Approach To Common Heart Attack Treatment
After a heart attack, doctors are changing practice trends as the debate continues on optimal time to administer antiplatelet therapy, researchers report.
As Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Tighten, Mindfulness Meditation Holds Promise for Pain Relief
As Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Tighten, Mindfulness Meditation Holds Promise for Pain Relief
Try nonpharmacologic and nonopioid therapies first, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended in a recently published opioid prescribing guideline for primary care clinicians in outpatient settings. The CDC’s call for nonph...
Abuse, Misuse of Antidiarrheal Linked To Serious Heart Problems
Abuse, Misuse of Antidiarrheal Linked To Serious Heart Problems
Abuse and misuse of the commonly available antidiarrheal medication loperamide (Imodium, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc) has been linked to life-threatening cardiac events, according to a warning issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). T...
The Four Burners Theory: The Downside of Work-Life Balance
The Four Burners Theory: The Downside of Work-Life Balance
One way to think about work-life balance issues is with a concept known as The Four Burners Theory. Here’s how it was first explained to me: Imagine that your life is represented by a stove with four burners on it. Each burner symbolizes one majo...
Study Suggests New Treatment For Seizures
Study Suggests New Treatment For Seizures
A new factor in the escalation of seizures has been discovered: the synthesis, or generation, of estrogens in the brain. This study also suggests that using a drug that inhibits estrogen synthesis, called an aromatase inhibitor, may be an effective app...
Camera-Based Monitoring Technology Measures Absolute Arterial Blood Oxygenation (Spo2) Levels Wit...
Camera-Based Monitoring Technology Measures Absolute Arterial Blood Oxygenation (Spo2) Levels Wit...
Royal Philips today announced the results of the first published study to demonstrate that absolute oxygen saturation of arterial blood (SpO2), a vital sign that is commonly monitored in hospitalized and other patients, can be accurately measured acros...